Why should taxpayers keep paying the salaries of sex perverts and gropers at PBS and NPR?


Following the firing of seven male hosts and editors at the government-sponsored PBS and NPR networks in 2017, many Americans are now asking themselves the question: If these guys aren’t going to be replaced with honest, decent non-predators, then is it really worth spending our tax dollars to keep these media outlets afloat?

In case you missed it, the “Malevolent Seven,” as some media outlets are calling them, were fired from NPR and PBS last year after being accused of groping or otherwise sexually harassing their female co-workers and subordinates. These individuals include:

• John Hockenberry from “The Takeaway,” which aired on New York City’s NPR affiliate. Hockenberry was accused of harassing and bullying female producers and interns – allegations that he says he was “horrified” to learn had been made against him.

• Michael Oreskes, a former editorial director and senior vice president of news at NPR who was kicked to the curb after several women claimed he forcibly kissed them back in the 1990s while they were seeking jobs at his previous employer, The New York Times (NYT).

• Garrison Keillor, creator of “A Prairie Home Companion” and veteran Minnesota Public Radio Host who was the subject of an investigation for sexual harassment. Keillor had penned a column defending fellow sexual harassment suspect Senator Al Franken.

• Charlie Rose, a PBS icon and CBS morning news host who was accused of groping grabbing, and harassing by phone as many as eight female employees, interns, and job applicants dating as far back as the 1990s.

• David Sweeney, a chief news editor at NPR who became the subject of an internal review after four of the public radio network’s female employees filed complaints against him, saying he gave them unwanted attention, gifts, and kisses.

• Tom Ashbrook, the former host of NPR’s “On Point” program, who was suspended from his position after several young women accused him of giving them “creepy” sex talks, hugs, and back rubs while in the studio.

• Tavis Smiley, a PBS host who was accused of similar bouts of sexual harassment. Smiley denies these allegations and says his employer is currently engaged in an aggressive witch hunt against him that’s “gone too far.”

If public radio and television refuse to balance their content, Americans shouldn’t be forced to foot the bill

Each of these individuals is only a suspect, of course, as none of the claims have been proven beyond a shadow of a doubt to be true. But they do suggest that there are quite a few left-leaning fixtures at these government-sponsored networks who may need to be replaced. But by whom?

Already, the establishment is lining up more leftists to take their place – many of them women – which points toward more of the same. If anything, the goal is simply to oust all the men and replace them with women, seeing as how popular American culture is currently positioned to be anti-male (and anti-white, for that matter) in almost every respect.

But should American taxpayers whose contributions keep networks like PBS and NPR afloat be forced to fund this assault on their values? Many of them are saying no – unless, of course, these networks decide to change course and employ a more balanced lineup of hosts and pundits that better represent all Americans, and not just those who register as Democrats.

“This is a golden opportunity for President Donald Trump to drain the elitist media swamps and inject true intellectual diversity in the newsrooms of NPR and PBS,” writes Michelle Malkin in a column for Truth Revolt.

“Liberal bias at these Beltway institutions is notorious – from NPR legal analyst Nina Totenberg wishing AIDS upon Sen. Jesse Helms and his grandchildren as ‘retributive justice,’ to ‘Sesame Street’s’ Oscar the Grouch mocking Fox News on PBS, to top NPR executives slamming the tea party movement as ‘scary’ and ‘racist’ to the undercover journalists of Project Veritas.”

Sources for this article include:

TruthRevolt.org

NaturalNews.com



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